Ep 20: Don’t Be A One Trick Pony

 

Full Show Transcript +
Erika Weichel:
There is always a way to get it done.

Speaker 2:
This is Episode 20 of the Michigan Real Estate Investor Network Podcast, #TheNetwork. We're coming to you from The Network Studios inside Michigan Investment Title. This episode is brought to you by [Soble 00:00:21] Law.

Dylan Tanaka:
Hey everybody, we are back with Michigan Real Estate Investor Network, #TheNetwork podcast. Super excited to be here on another round table edition. Today, we are going to be talking about how not to be a one-trick pony. I'm Dylan Tanaka. We're going to go around the table, introduce ourselves, and tell a little bit about what we do in this business of real estate investing.

Nate Guinane:
I'm Nathan Guinane. I'm a buy-and-hold investor throughout metro Detroit. I also do flips, but I mainly am focused on just multi-family.

Hassan Imran:
Hey guys. My name's Hassan. I'm a buy-and-hold investor too. I own some properties in metro Detroit focusing on mixed-use and apartment complexes.

Erika Weichel:
I'm Erika Weichel, president of Michigan Investment Title. I help real estate investors get their deals done.

Erika Weichel:
Hassan, you are our guest today.

Hassan Imran:
Cool.

Erika Weichel:
We've done some business together. Do you want to tell us a little bit about how you got started? Because you have an unusual pattern to your deals.

Hassan Imran:
Sure, sure, sure. Yeah. I mean I started three years ago. Since then, I've just been coming back because it's been so easy to do business.

Erika Weichel:
Oh, thanks.

Hassan Imran:
I essentially started by buying a property. My dad works in hospitality. I had 20 grand saved up from my job, said, "Hey, can I invest this in a hotel?" He said, "No, go and do your own thing." That just started snowballing and trying to find ways to invest money, so I just started finding off-market deals after I bought my first one on the MLS in 2016. Since then, it's just been rolling and going. The main focus has just been lead generation, finding really good deals, wholesaling the ones that don't make sense for me to hold it in my portfolio, and just going from there. Yeah.

Erika Weichel:
That is your main source.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Erika Weichel:
Your day-to-day, everyday job is real estate investing.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. I quit after a year. After a year of doing real estate, I quit my full-time job.

Erika Weichel:
I think that's what we all did, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, a couple of years for me, but yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. Back in the '70s, it took you longer to quit your job, so I wasn't quite that fast, but-

Hassan Imran:
It was inflation, right?

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, I think that was the thing back then.

Dylan Tanaka:
I've been full-time since, I think, '07.

Hassan Imran:
Nice.

Dylan Tanaka:
So I'm 12 years deep.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah. Well, that's good. No, so everything's just been hunky-dory since I quit. I can't imagine going back. Even I was talking to a friend the other day, and he was complaining about that he had to mow the grass. I was like, "Dude, I would pull the weeds out all day rather than going back to a full-time job." I would do that.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, and weed's a big thing, right now, in real estate.

Hassan Imran:
That's true. That's true. Oh, man.

Erika Weichel:
Where do you want to go from there?

Hassan Imran:
We can talk about weed. I mean I don't... I mean it's like that one guy's podcast. They smoke on there. Are we doing that here too?

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. I don't know. I just saw Mike Tyson on his podcast, and they're spending-

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, it's a big-

Dylan Tanaka:
... 40Gs a month or was it 400,000 a month?

Hassan Imran:
Wow.

Nate Guinane:
On what?

Dylan Tanaka:
Weed.

Hassan Imran:
Wow.

Dylan Tanaka:
Just smoking it, just-

Nate Guinane:
That's great.

Dylan Tanaka:
That's how much they're just smoking for fun. It's not with the podcast. That's what Iron Mike's into now, and he looks old, man.

Hassan Imran:
It's his slowing down.

Dylan Tanaka:
It's taking a toll on him.

Hassan Imran:
It's his slow down.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. He said, thankfully, he found it because he was a maniac before that. I didn't know that. I guess when you chew people's ears off, you might need to puff a little cheeba.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Erika Weichel:
Oh, my God.

Nate Guinane:
Can we go a little more into his mixed-used deal?

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah, sure.

Erika Weichel:
I think that would be great.

Nate Guinane:
That might... Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Why don't you explain what mixed-use is?

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah. I've only done one mixed-use deal, so I'm not some expert, FYI. In terms of my understanding, mixed-use is anything where you have more than one asset class in one structure or one parcel. You can have residential on there. You can have retail, office. It's usually not mixed with industrial just because there's a lot of noise, typically, but that's the general idea of it.

Hassan Imran:
The mixed-use deal that we just bought, and Erika helped us close on it at MIT, and basically we... I found it from a cold-call about a year ago. The guy used to run a paint shop in his business. 10 years ago, he closed it down, so I had contacted him to buy his duplex. He said that, "Hey, everything's on one parcel. I have to sell you the whole thing." We went through, did some analysis, did the due diligence, and then basically closed on it about two weeks ago, so...

Nate Guinane:
Was a... Sorry. Right when he said he'd be willing to sell it, did it take a long time to negotiate a price?

Hassan Imran:
Oh, definitely, yeah, so-

Nate Guinane:
He started out real high?

Hassan Imran:
No. He didn't start out real high. I just started out real low. He's a old guy. The old people take a long time to make decisions. That was basically the hinging factor just waiting for him, but I would touch base almost every month. I would stop by his house randomly. It was really weird stuff, but eventually, he just said, "Okay, whatever. I'll give it to you." He agreed on a fair price. There was a lot of rehab after we did our inspection, so then we negotiated a land contract, which he gave it to me at 4%, 5 years.

Dylan Tanaka:
What city was this in?

Hassan Imran:
This is in Berkley, so the property's closer to downtown, the downtown area.

Dylan Tanaka:
Gotcha. Let me break in real quick and tell you how classy this young man, Hassan, is. I was actually in the office that day on another closing when you were here closing that deal.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
This guy brought food for the whole office. Let that be a lesson to all you young and old investors out there. Bring food, and people like you.

Erika Weichel:
That's true. If you feed us, it helps. It definitely helps.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, man. Thanks.

Erika Weichel:
It was good food.

Hassan Imran:
I know. I know.

Erika Weichel:
That was a lot of food too.

Hassan Imran:
It was tasty. It was tasty.

Erika Weichel:
We ate that for the next day or two after that, and the girls were taking it home and fighting over certain things. It was pretty good.

Hassan Imran:
It was tasty.

Erika Weichel:
Yeah, [crosstalk 00:06:09]-

Dylan Tanaka:
Being close to downtown Berkley, that's huge, right?

Hassan Imran:
It is. It is very helpful, yeah, yeah. It's a great location. I still don't know exactly what I'm going to do with it, but at least, from day one, I'm not losing money. I'm not putting money into the deal, so it's covering the debt service. It's covering insurance and property taxes, so I can at least go ahead and figure out a game plan, but [crosstalk 00:06:31]-

Erika Weichel:
What's on that parcel now?

Hassan Imran:
There is a 3,000-square-foot retail space/office. There's also a two-car garage that's about 600 square feet and then a stand-alone duplex that's also on the parcel and then some lawn space that's on a intersection on 12 Mile.

Erika Weichel:
That duplex, was it already tenanted when you got it?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, yeah. I did move out the bottom tenants just because we increased the rents day one before closing, but yeah, it is. Right now, top unit is rented. The retail space is also being used for storage, and then the garage is going to be rented out for 400, so...

Erika Weichel:
Can we talk a little bit about that big deal?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Erika Weichel:
We don't have to go into a lot of detail, but... because I know you worked that deal for a very long time as well. Do you want to tell us a little bit about that?

Hassan Imran:
The one from last year?

Erika Weichel:
Yeah, yeah.

Hassan Imran:
That one was really fun. Basically, the guy's name was [Old Ron 00:07:30]. I connected with him in 2016, early 20... Basically, it was the first time I was cold-calling. Still, at that point, I was just cold-calling on a spreadsheet. I had no systems. All we did was just skip trace numbers. I would just go onto White Pages, look up the numbers, and start dialing.

Hassan Imran:
I called this guy. He had a place in Hazel Park. He said, "No, I don't want to sell it," bu he seemed like a cool guy, so I just stayed in touch. He said, "Well." The second time I called him, he said, "You know what? You caught me on my good day. I'll sell it to you but not now." Then I was like, "All right. This person is at least some sort of lead," so I just stayed in touch with him. He told me he liked coffee. He drank eight cups of coffee a day, and so I bought him some Starbucks coffee, the grounds, and dropped them off at his house. I just sent him handwritten letters every two, three months. One day, he called me, and he was like, "Hey, I want to sell my portfolio." That day I went into my manager's office, quit my job. Then, in the next three months, we closed it, so...

Erika Weichel:
Again, I mean we were talking about not being a one-trick pony. You had to use, I mean, several different types of ways to either find people, different... Persistence is another one.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah.

Erika Weichel:
These deals didn't happen overnight. No one was flagging you down, so you actually had to go and find ways to find people, talk to them, build rapport, and stay patient.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah. That's the hardest part, yeah.

Erika Weichel:
Then how many properties did that one guy...

Hassan Imran:
Sell?

Erika Weichel:
Yeah.

Hassan Imran:
He sold 13 or 14 properties, yeah.

Erika Weichel:
In that portfolio.

Hassan Imran:
From between metro Detroit, 13, 14, none were in Detroit, so...

Erika Weichel:
Nice.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, it was a fun deal. Then I went to Vietnam.

Erika Weichel:
For a month, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Erika Weichel:
That's amazing.

Hassan Imran:
That's like you always take time to... even the actor, Matthew McConaughey, he always just... every time he's about to do a film or after he gets done, he takes about three weeks off. I realized the same thing even in my life. You take a few weeks off, and you get to zoom out of your own life, and you can assess, "All right. Where do I want to go with this strategy, and what do I want to do?" I feel like that's pretty important even though you get stuck in the day to day, but then you take a step back and you say, "Okay, wait. Let me reassess everything. What am I trying to do here?"

Erika Weichel:
You have done a motorbike. Didn't you buy a motorbike or something while you were there and rode around for weeks?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Erika Weichel:
You figured out your next step.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, yeah, basically. Every time I go, I'm like, "Oh, I'm going to figure out so much." I get to the end, I'm like, "What did I do here? This was a lot of fun." It's just time for nothing. Your brain just gets a chance to decompress and think.

Erika Weichel:
You were by yourself.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, totally go solo.

Erika Weichel:
Traveling by yourself does help with that.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. There's so many benefits apart from just the travel part. You get to learn how to solve problems. If you don't know where you're going to stay, you don't know where you're going to eat, that's basically what you have to figure out, so day-to-day challenges, but it helps you in many ways.

Erika Weichel:
I stay at the resort, so I know where I'm going to stay and eat. I'm not quite that brave. What about you guys? What do you think about that? Are you guys...

Dylan Tanaka:
I'm just waiting for Hassan's book to come out because I know him well enough I'll get the autograph.

Erika Weichel:
Yeah, right?

Dylan Tanaka:
Listen, this is how these millennial guys act. I don't know how old Hassan is, but he's way younger than me. If I hit 13 deals, I'd be running and working another 80 hours. It's just that different mindset, which is very cool. We've got a couple different generations here at the table, obviously a very young lady with Erika.

Erika Weichel:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Old guy with me, then a couple millennial dudes across the table from me. Honestly, I mean that's what the round table's all about. It's getting a mix of how people think about things, mindset, why you're in this business. You're not just in this business to buy and sell houses or apartment buildings or borrow and lend money, whatever it is, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
It's to be able to build that lifestyle so you weren't stuck in that cube being told what to do.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, totally.

Dylan Tanaka:
You can get locked in if you got a bunch of rentals in being told what to do because your tenants become your boss.

Hassan Imran:
Exactly, yeah. It's all about systems at that point, right? You figure out a way to systemize your day-to-day stuff so you can deconnect and connect.

Dylan Tanaka:
Right.

Erika Weichel:
Well, we were just talking about that before we were recording. I mean things happen and then, all of a sudden, you realize that your systems need to change. It's constantly evolving.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, definitely, definitely.

Nate Guinane:
The 13-property deal, was it single-families, duplexes?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, so one of them was a duplex in St. Clair Shores, but the rest were single-families.

Nate Guinane:
Did you actually buy them all or wholesale them or piece it out?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, so I-

Dylan Tanaka:
Nate's all about the deal. He's like, "I don't want to hear about Vietnam. That's cool. I watched the movie."

Nate Guinane:
No, Vietnam's sweet. I would do the same thing.

Dylan Tanaka:
"I watched the movie. Tell me about the deals."

Hassan Imran:
It is. No, the podcast is about real estate. It was 13 of those properties. I didn't put them all into my name, so I assigned them all at closing, so everyone-

Dylan Tanaka:
Break that down real quick again for the watchers and listeners who don't really understand what that means.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, wait. Before you do that too, with that, explain if you did 13 to 1 guy or if you had 10 buyers and pieced them all out.

Hassan Imran:
For sure.

Dylan Tanaka:
Before you do that, was it a regular motorcycle or a moped?

Hassan Imran:
It was definitely a motorcycle.

Dylan Tanaka:
Okay. All right.

Hassan Imran:
It was like a nice Honda Civic.

Dylan Tanaka:
Wow.

Hassan Imran:
Or no, not a Honda Civic.

Dylan Tanaka:
Honda Civic.

Hassan Imran:
Honda Win. Honda Win.

Dylan Tanaka:
Honda Win. All right.

Hassan Imran:
But it was fake, I found out at the end, that's it's not a real... because I bought it for 100 bucks, right?

Erika Weichel:
It's a fairy tale [crosstalk 00:12:52].

Nate Guinane:
Can't complain for 100 bucks.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. I sold it for 150, too, when I left, so...

Nate Guinane:
Flipped a motorcycle in Vietnam.

Hassan Imran:
Yes, sir, so...

Dylan Tanaka:
All right, so go ahead and back up and break that down for us.

Hassan Imran:
All right, so basically, once I got connected with Old Ron and he decided that he wanted to sell the deal, he wanted to sell all of his properties, so I said, "Okay. Let me give you an offer for all of it." Essentially, once we had negotiated a price, I think it was 570, 600, somewhere in there, I had determined the ones that I wanted to keep and the ones that I wanted to sell. The ones I didn't want to keep, basically, I wanted to sell those, about five, six of those. They were in Warren, just areas where I'm not comfortable buying yet. I sent those out onto Facebook and on some wholesalers' lists. I just connected with them. I said, "Hey, guys. Shoot this out. I'll give you a referral fee, whatever you need."

Dylan Tanaka:
Referral fees are nice.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, definitely, definitely, for doing nothing. You just pass out-

Dylan Tanaka:
I don't know about nothing.

Hassan Imran:
Well-

Dylan Tanaka:
Build a 5,000-person list.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, yeah, but then it's leveraged, right? I sent them out, and one person reached out. He basically said he wanted to buy them all. I said, "Okay. I've already done my inspection, so I can't do it again." I said, "I want to sell it without any inspections." I had all the photos on Google Photos, so it was up there. They looked at everything. I said, "Look, you guys have to waive your inspections, bring in cash, and we can close on it." It was still a fair deal for them. I think the value on the properties was probably close to a million. They bought it for 6 or 700, 700 I think. Wait, no, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, so they had a huge layer of security there.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Just in case there was bad basement or two or whatever.

Hassan Imran:
Exactly.

Dylan Tanaka:
Not that you're selling anything bad, but I've bought houses sight unseen, and I'm not buying them at full price versus being able to look at them, of course. Nate's done the same thing.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, no, for sure.

Dylan Tanaka:
We do crazy stuff.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
It's all about the dollar.

Nate Guinane:
You need to actually discount for that.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah.

Hassan Imran:
So, so...

Dylan Tanaka:
The risk discount.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, it's a risk-reward analysis. Everyone has their own threshold, and so-

Dylan Tanaka:
Break down how these guys bought them so everybody understands that you didn't close on them at Michigan Investment Title and then resell them to them and...

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, so it was basically a process. It's called assignment/wholesaling in real estate. You basically get a property owner to sign a contract to sell them to you and, in that contract, you have something called an assignability clause where it gives you the ability to assign properties whether that's in part or the whole thing. Then you can basically go ahead and sell that piece of paper or that contract to someone else, and they buy that piece of paper from you, and then they pay for the purchase price that you have on the contract and your fee on top of it. That's how it's structured. In some states, it's not legal, but I think this is Michigan only, so [crosstalk 00:15:30]-

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. I don't care what anybody thinks. Talk to a lawyer. Figure out what you got to do.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, true.

Dylan Tanaka:
Everybody has speed bumps, and they stop. Old Ron knew what you were doing. You weren't pulling the wool over his eyes.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
You explained to him how you were going to sell him. He-

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. Well, actually, in the beginning, I told him I was going to buy it all. Midway through, I said, "Hey, I'm going to sell some of these, but either way, I'll close even if I don't find a buyer."

Dylan Tanaka:
Right, but you explained it to him.

Hassan Imran:
I would still... Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
You didn't lie to him.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, yeah, no.

Dylan Tanaka:
Then you got him sold. He was happy. He got his money. You got your end. You got to keep a few. You got to sell a few and turned out to be one of the most famous deals that you hear in real estate because that was '16, right, or '16/'17. What year?

Hassan Imran:
Oh, that was at the end of 2018, so it was actually just-

Dylan Tanaka:
Oh. It was at the end of last year?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Okay.

Hassan Imran:
It was in December.

Nate Guinane:
Pretty recent.

Dylan Tanaka:
I heard about it like a year before it seemed like, but-

Hassan Imran:
Oh, okay. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
I guess it was just the rumors were flying at all the networking events that some young guy had 13 houses under contract.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, sweet.

Dylan Tanaka:
I was trying to find the guy and offer him more.

Erika Weichel:
You're famous.

Dylan Tanaka:
But I wasn't able to do it. No, I'm kidding. No, one day, we'll break all that down, all the different protections you can have, as a buyer, once you put somebody under contract to make sure that somebody else can't just sneak in. That's important stuff to know, but yeah, I mean that's just an awesome deal. As soon as I heard about it, we knew that we wanted to get you on the show to talk about it. One day, we'll break that whole thing down, I think, a case study and really whiteboard it.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, for sure. Any time, so-

Dylan Tanaka:
Cool. What's up with you, Nate? What are you working on?

Nate Guinane:
I'm finishing up that one rehab I got in St. Clair Shores. I sold my last rehab just a couple weeks ago through Erika. There was a couple closings, but yeah, so she closed that. Like I said, working on this flip. I think I'm buying another one that I might hold as a rental or a flip. I'm not sure yet, but really just looking at a lot of multi-family.

Hassan Imran:
Nice.

Nate Guinane:
Going to Grand Rapids on Monday to look at multi-family over there. I've actually never been to Grand Rapids, I was just telling Hassan, so we're going to check out the area. I'm going with [Tio 00:17:29]. He's got a friend there that's an investor, so he's going to show us around. He has some properties to look at. I got a buddy there too that we might meet up with who also invests over there, so they're going to show us around and see how that area is, expand the network a little bit. Yeah, that's about it, I think. I think I'm actually making a hard money loan too.

Hassan Imran:
Sweet.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, so on a property that's stupidly safe deal, so yeah. Usually, I don't do that, but-

Dylan Tanaka:
Well, this is the whole point of this show. I knew when we got all of us together, the whole one-trick pony thing... Hassan's done residential. He's done multi-deal deals residential, mixed-use, multi-family. Nate's making loans. He's buying multi-family. He's buying rentals. He's flipping houses.

Nate Guinane:
I got a mixed-use too.

Hassan Imran:
[crosstalk 00:18:11], yeah.

Nate Guinane:
I may talk to Hassan after about it.

Dylan Tanaka:
The whole point of this is when you have an opportunity thrown at you, Hassan could have said, "I can't handle 13 deals." I started investing when I was your age, probably, so I'd get those calls because this is long before there was a bunch of people sending out letters and everything. We were one of the first couple people doing it or strong anyways.

Dylan Tanaka:
I'd get a call from a guy with 7 or 12 properties, and I'd freak out because I'm like, "What do we do with this?" You go to be able to take that and chew on it for a minute and say, "Okay. How can we work this out and be able to put together a creative deal and not just say, 'Um, cash'?" You could have went to that guy with 500 cash, and he was like, "No. I don't want 500 cash," so you worked it out a six something or whatever it was, and you still made a healthy amount of money, enough to quit your job, which is always a big fear and worry for people.

Dylan Tanaka:
Going just back to what Nate said, he gets an opportunity thrown at him, and maybe he doesn't want to buy the deal. Maybe the guys who brings it to him wants it, and he's going to lend him the money somehow and just make money that way.

Hassan Imran:
True, yep.

Dylan Tanaka:
You got to be smart enough. I talk about it's like when a soccer ball gets kicked into a circle. You're not just going to kick it a certain way, right? You're going to use your knees. You're going to use your chest. You're going to use your shoulders. You're going to use your elbows, whatever you can do to keep that thing going. You got to be flexible and really have different ways to do things because, in today's market, it's a hot market, so it's really hard to find good opportunities. I mean you've only done... not only, but I mean you've done a few deals, but they were bigger deals. If you were fighting for 13, it takes half a year to do 13 deals for a lot of guys and girls who are serious. You did it like that. I know it took a year or nine months, but was that the only thing you did? Of course not because you only worked on that 6% of the time.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, yeah. I think even coming back to figuring out how to take down a deal that's outside of your comfort zone, I think there's probably a few factors. One, I have an opinion, I don't know where I heard it, but I heard it on some podcast a long time ago. The guy was like, "If you read five books on any topic, you are smarter now than 95% of people in the world on that topic." It could be on neuroscience. It can be on physics. It can be on real estate. Now you know more than 95%. Now the only 5% is the people who are writing those books or doing that stuff every day.

Hassan Imran:
That's what you do first. Then now, once you have that elementary knowledge, then you just start connecting with people who do it on a daily basis. At least they're going to take you seriously because you know the terminology or they know that you're for real.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. We talk about that all the time. Nate's a big reader. I consider myself a big reader. You've got to be able to sit down with somebody, whether you're talking to a CEO or the CEO of five rentals, and speak their language and understand. I always tell these stories. These guys will stand around. They'll smoke cigarettes and kick dirt and they'll say, "What are you going to give me for this?" or, "How much do I got to give to buy that?" You're like, "What does that mean?" Right? Then you sit down with the CEO and he's like, "How does your portfolio look, and how are you on cash right now?" They all speak different. If you can sit down with them and break it down and make them understand or believe that you-

Nate Guinane:
In their language.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, in their language. You got to make them comfortable.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, definitely.

Erika Weichel:
Well, and you want to sound intelligent when you're speaking to somebody like that that you're going to make money from.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, for sure.

Dylan Tanaka:
You don't always have to sound intelligent either.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, [inaudible 00:21:27] both ways. It goes both ways.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, for sure.

Erika Weichel:
Dylan, you want to tell us about your last deal? That was the quickest deal I've ever seen happen-

Hassan Imran:
How fast?

Erika Weichel:
... from the time you got a phone call to the time we closed.

Dylan Tanaka:
Oh. Yeah, so sometimes you get lucky. It's always better to be lucky than good, so this time I was lucky. I had just a regular house that I took down. I've only closed on a couple houses in the last couple years, which I'm proud to say because I'm only assigning right now. I'm also doing new construction and a project, but that's a whole different thing. Yeah, I got a call from a new investor. Actually, I got a couple emails. He kept asking me how much he had to bring to the title company. You know when you get those emails, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
You're like, "Yeah, whatever. Don't waste my time." Then, finally, I got him on the phone. He was like, "No, I'm new at this. I'm really excited to do this deal." The numbers made sense. It was a buy-and-hold property. It's going to be a mega cash flow deal for the guy. From that conversation to close was about 3 days, and everything was funded. He's super-duper happy.

Hassan Imran:
Sweet.

Dylan Tanaka:
I'm going to get him on a podcast. He's got a couple partners. Another young guy, which is awesome. I don't know exactly where he found me. He found me somewhere on Facebook because I do tend to post my deals on there and put a lot of information on there, so I found him on there or he found me on there. Once we got connected, he looked at all the things that I do in the networking groups and podcasts and hanging out with guys and ladies like you. That brought his resistance down. He wasn't nervous to do business with me.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah. That's cool.

Dylan Tanaka:
Right away, I sent him some information that night. I cc'd Erika. Erika explained some stuff to him too about closing and just backed up what I had told him, so it made him comfortable and just knocked it out of the part in three days, which that doesn't happen all the time. Like I said, much better to be lucky than good, but I don't always roll 7s and 11, so...

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. No, that's true. That's true, yeah. Plus, luck is so far out of your control too.

Dylan Tanaka:
Absolutely.

Hassan Imran:
It's like, man, sometimes you just get really lucky and you're like, "Wow."

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, like they say-

Hassan Imran:
You look back it, "What the hell happened?"

Dylan Tanaka:
The harder you work, the luckier you get, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, exactly.

Dylan Tanaka:
When you put in work every day, you get lucky. How many free throws did Michael Jordan shoot?

Nate Guinane:
I'm guessing the only reason it went that quick is because he looked you up and saw that you've been doing stuff for years.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah.

Erika Weichel:
[inaudible 00:23:42]-

Nate Guinane:
It took years to get to the trust, basically, on that, even though it was three days, right?

Erika Weichel:
It was because he was out of town and he had me.

Nate Guinane:
Probably. That, yeah. That helped.

Erika Weichel:
That's why it was [crosstalk 00:23:50].

Dylan Tanaka:
Listen, here's how it works. When you do a lot of business with one company, you can leverage that, so it definitely was a huge help and game-changer. Yeah, I mean that just what it's all about, making people feel comfortable, being able to speak their language.

Dylan Tanaka:
I didn't know this kid was in his early 20s, but I do high school mentoring through Winning Future, so some of my mentees are still older than you guys. I've been doing it for 10 years now, so I know how to talk to those 20-year-old kids. Plus, it's fun talking to the young guys and helping them. I let them know, "Whatever you need. If you need an insurance guy, if you need the clean-out guy, the house is cleaned out, but just... if you need to to work with the city... You know what I mean? If you need to navigate the paperwork, just come to me. I'll help you."

Dylan Tanaka:
I went full concierge because, A, I was doing business with them. I was making money. More importantly, it's not today's deal. This kid's 22, let's say. Well, I'm going to be around for 50 more years flipping houses, right, so I got 50 more years of business with this guy. I don't believe in cutting people's heads off. I call it being a head chopper because when you cut somebody's head off, they're dead. It's got to be a fair trade for everybody.

Dylan Tanaka:
There's guys that I wholesale houses to that rehab, and I can make 20, 30 grand on a wholesale, and they make 40, 50. You know what they say? "Give me more."

Hassan Imran:
That's how it works. That's how it works. You treat them good.

Erika Weichel:
Yeah, so I mean between all three of you, I mean the deals are insane between either the type of properties or how you purchased them or how you bought them or if you're lending money. I mean there are just so many different avenues for you guys to make money. The more creative you are, the more I like it because it's something new for me, so...

Dylan Tanaka:
Well, even doubling back on what Erika talked about when she helped me out when I was out of town, not being a one-trick pony as a title agency too is huge for guys like us.

Nate Guinane:
Oh, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Because whether it's getting a question answered... I've been running [REAAs 00:25:40] and stuff for along time, so there's new people, not just young, bu new people that'll come to me and say, "Hey, I'm buying a house on a quick-claim deed, and I'm going to sign it at McDonald's," and all this and that. I'm like, "Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. You got to talk to a title company. You got talk to an attorney, a CPA, brokers, people like us who have gotten their legs blown off or know people that have, and you got to slow down."

Dylan Tanaka:
Michigan Investment Title is able to get a lot of those deals done that other places either don't want to do or won't take the time to do. Not that it's their job to talk to our clients, but I have had clients call here and make sure what I told them was true and that we were actually closing or the funds were going to be there. The answer's yeah every time.

Hassan Imran:
Especially in this business too because some sellers are like, "Wait a minute. Is this a hoax or something?" Right?

Dylan Tanaka:
Sure.

Hassan Imran:
"Or am I Just going to lose my place?"

Erika Weichel:
There is always a way to get it done. It might be around the back way to get it done, but there is always a way to get that deal done. We'll figure it out. That's what we do.

Hassan Imran:
That's what Erika helped me out with two weeks ago or three weeks ago when I called her. I didn't have Erika's cell phone at that time, and so I texted [crosstalk 00:26:44]-

Dylan Tanaka:
What's that number? It's 248... No.

Erika Weichel:
Stop, no.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah. Let me go and look it up.

Erika Weichel:
No.

Hassan Imran:
So as far-

Dylan Tanaka:
Text your deals in, everybody.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, so I contacted someone else who had it. Then I reached out to Erika Friday night. I think you were eating dinner, and I was like, "Hey, I have to get this deal done by Monday," because the guy I was assigning the complex to, he was like, "I need to close by Monday or else I'm flying to Turkey."

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. This was the mixed-use commercial deal, so it's not like a-

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. It was an apartment complex, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
It's not like a $50,000 house that you can figure out quick.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, it was a lot of paperwork.

Dylan Tanaka:
Wow.

Hassan Imran:
It's like relationships like that, right? One, it's complex already.

Dylan Tanaka:
That's huge.

Hassan Imran:
Then to have someone on your side who's like, "Okay, I can take care of that."

Dylan Tanaka:
Well, the difference is it's pretty much impossible to say that you're ever going to go anywhere else when you get service like that because I don't care what business we're in. It's hard enough to go to a restaurant or a coffee shop and get your order right. When it's something that's that huge and just... I mean that's awesome. I didn't know that, so cool.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah. I had a small deal probably three weeks ago through Erika. It was a small deal, so nothing like that. I missed a message from her that she probably sent at 10:00 a.m. At 11:30 p.m., I message her back. Two minutes later, she shot me a message. I was like, "Oh, I didn't mean to wake you up." She's like, "No, I'm still at the office."

Hassan Imran:
Oh, my God.

Nate Guinane:
I go, "Oh, that's crazy." Like I said, it was a small deal, so yeah. No, it was awesome service for sure.

Hassan Imran:
Well, it's a nice office too, so-

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, yeah.

Erika Weichel:
Thanks.

Hassan Imran:
... you can hang out here.

Dylan Tanaka:
Let's get Nate some water.

Nate Guinane:
Thank you. I keep coughing [inaudible 00:28:13].

Dylan Tanaka:
Like I said, man, full service. This is how we do it, right? How we do business.

Dylan Tanaka:
Finishing up here, I'd like to go around the table and ask everyone... I like to do this because I know I'm in control and I know what I'm going to say, so I'll go last. No, I'm kidding. It's like when you go to lunch with somebody and nobody knows what they're going to get, and they always want to go last.

Dylan Tanaka:
What books have you listened to or read that have made a huge impact, whether it was 10 years ago or yesterday? Hassan, you go first. You're the guest.

Hassan Imran:
It has to be one, or it can be a few books or-

Dylan Tanaka:
It can be 20 books.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, okay. Well-

Dylan Tanaka:
We'll put them all in the show notes.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, sweet, sweet. Can I Amazon Affiliate those?

Dylan Tanaka:
We've already got that covered.

Hassan Imran:
Damn. No, I'm just kidding. I think the first book I read was 4-Hour Workweek, which was just a mind shift to start thinking about how to make money passively, so that was fantastic for me. It wasn't real estate associated but just business. Then Confessions of a Real Estate Entrepreneur, that book is really good too. He talks a lot about creative deals, commercial stuff.

Dylan Tanaka:
Who's the author on that?

Hassan Imran:
Ooh, I don't know his name. Joe...

Dylan Tanaka:
Fairless?

Hassan Imran:
No, no, no, no, no. I think it's Randel but not the mortgage guy. That's local. It's another Joe Randel. That book was really good.

Hassan Imran:
There's another book that I'm reading right now. It's called Seeking Wisdom: From Darwin to Munger, which is really cool. I think also Poor Charlies' Almanack, which is written by Charlie Munger, if you guys have heard about it.

Dylan Tanaka:
Sure.

Hassan Imran:
The concepts in there are groundbreaking, not groundbreaking. I'm sure they've been around for a while, but...

Dylan Tanaka:
This goes into not being a one-trick pony. Most people, hopefully, know who Charlie Munger is, but tell them who Charlie Munger is.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah. Charlie Munger is Warren Buffett's partner at Berkshire Hathaway. Berkshire Hathaway would be nowhere as close to how big it is without that guy.

Dylan Tanaka:
Right. Hassan's reading about creative real estate deals and how Warren Buffett, who's basically the greatest investor of our lifetime, maybe ever, does business.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
That's a lot deeper than 13 houses, but that's where those concepts come from.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, and it's all about, at some point, analyzing risk and rewards, whatever you're doing. You're just analyzing, "Okay, here's the risk that I'm taking." For me, my general criteria is I can risk a dollar to make five. That means I can lose 4 times and still break even, or five times. Essentially, if you start reading and then basically this idea of a latticework in your brain of different subjects that you can then connect.

Hassan Imran:
That's what Charlie Munger talks about. He's like, "Okay, you study these different topics in life because then you'll start to connect the dots that normal people can't connect." If you study topics like critical mass in physics or engineering and all these different things that, on the surface, they don't connect, but your brain will start to think about things in ways like, even if it's associated to investing, you'll start to connect it to topics in physics because, like Charlie Munger said, all the wisdom in the world is not contained within one academic department, right?

Dylan Tanaka:
Sure.

Hassan Imran:
Then you start connecting these dots. That's really where you can start to really do big stuff, so...

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, that's awesome. I'm glad that guys like Nate and Hassan are so smart because they're going to graduate from real estate investing, and I'll still be here slugging it out with my South Warren rentals.

Dylan Tanaka:
Nate, I know you're a big reader. What do you think? What do you got?

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, so I try to say a different book every time. A book I read maybe a year and a half ago was by Ray Dalio. It's called Principles. It might be Life and Work or-

Dylan Tanaka:
It's one of the greatest business books of all time.

Hassan Imran:
Awesome.

Nate Guinane:
You read it?

Dylan Tanaka:
Oh, yeah.

Nate Guinane:
It's awesome, yeah.

Hassan Imran:
It's good?

Nate Guinane:
No, it was really good.

Hassan Imran:
Okay.

Nate Guinane:
He's supposed to come out with a second one which... That's why I get confused, because one of them's like life work something and then another one's business something. The book I read, one of the main themes he talks about is a meritocracy or whatever, how he set up his company. Meritocracy means, if I own the company, a lot of people would be like, "Hassan, you have to do this this way. You have to do this." His meritocracy is everyone comes up with an idea, and everyone basically votes. In a way, basically, everyone has equal power based on how intelligent they are in that realm. If you're really good at wholesaling, you would actually outweigh me even though I might own the company. I don't know. It's really interesting, though. It's a good way to leverage everyone's talents and allow them to be the best they can be, and it increases your company crazy.

Nate Guinane:
That guy, just so you that you know, Ray Dalio's a billionaire, a investor. He started out in commodities and has one of the largest funds in the world, but yeah, so all his principles apply to anything, so it's a different viewpoint than most people-

Dylan Tanaka:
That book's like 16 hours long if you get the audio version.

Nate Guinane:
Yep, I have the audio version. I believe I read it too, but-

Dylan Tanaka:
It's basically two books in one, actually, right?

Nate Guinane:
Well, yeah it is. It is unless, when I listened to it, maybe he didn't come out with the second part, but it's really long. The audio was 16 or 18 hours. It was ridiculously long. I think I read it too, but that was really good.

Nate Guinane:
Back to what Hassan was saying about listening to different subjects, I used to be really interested in neurological science, how brains work. That's super helpful, right? I know I forgot a lot of it, and I remember most of it. It's just cool because you, by knowing that stuff, you understand how other people's brains work and how yours works. I think I'm able to maximize my reading, all that stuff, and retain most of it because I understand how your brain works and operates and those connections. He was saying, too, just by having multiple connections, your brain gets better at getting new connections and remembering more.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah. You got to build-

Nate Guinane:
It's like a workout.

Dylan Tanaka:
Right.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
You build those neurons, and they start connecting. It's just like-

Nate Guinane:
Those books were awesome, so same thing.

Dylan Tanaka:
... lifting weights at different angles and working the same muscle, but it changes everything down deep.

Nate Guinane:
Yep.

Dylan Tanaka:
Wow.

Nate Guinane:
I recommend to read outside of real estate. Try to do 50/50 if... Then when you get to know real estate a lot better, it might be 70/30, 70 outside, 30 in, so...

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, I agree. I stopped doing real estate investment education years and years ago because I'd done a lot of those deals already, not that you shouldn't go back and refresh yourself, but I spend most of my time either reading about sales, neuroscience also, psychology, or just mindset.

Dylan Tanaka:
I got a new book called Fearvana and some older guy's... I'm labeled and OG when I go out of town and hang out with some of these guys because I'm in the over-40 club, right, and everybody else is like 25. They're all reading a book called Fearvana, these older guys who are in their 50s and 60s because they're having a hard time going from, "I'm doing business. I'm doing okay," to, "How do I do 13 deals in one swat?" You know what I mean? How do I kill 13 flies with one swat? Because they're not there. They don't have that mindset.

Dylan Tanaka:
Every book helps. I don't think it's going to super change my mindset because I do have a ridiculous belief in my ability, but it's always a good to listen to what those guys say. I mean I'm just being honest. Listen, it's not-

Nate Guinane:
That was a good way to put it.

Dylan Tanaka:
Hassan did 13 deals. I know I can do 13 deals. He knows he can do 130 because you add a zero, it makes no difference. Somebody was talking to me about Nate. Nate's good at raising money. Young in the business, I was good raising money also. The more you get, the easier it is. You can't find a $20,000 lender. That's a pain in the neck, but you can fink a 200K lender. Then, when the time comes, a 20 million, not 2 million, a $20 million lender, bam, they're there like that because if you have the right opportunity, real money finds it. We're still playing a little bit in the little leagues.

Dylan Tanaka:
You guys are a lot of years behind me, so you're going to surpass me by my age, for sure, but you got to have that belief in yourself because, if you don't and you're an entrepreneur, you better be able to either do software or build video games or figure out how to make the next pill or something because, I tell you what, you got to be able to take a beating and get back up.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, I agree with you. I just thought it was funny. I think the same thing about myself, so that's just funny hearing someone say it.

Dylan Tanaka:
Right. Everybody thinks I got a ego problem.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah. I just don't say it. No. Yeah, no, I agree, though. You have to have self-confidence basically.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, so can you recommend also a neuroscience book? Because I would be interested in reading more on that?

Nate Guinane:
Yeah. I'll have to look back on which ones I read. I probably still own a couple of them. A couple were digital, but yeah, that's a awesome topic. You can find some real cool articles because that just get crazier every day. I started reading about that maybe seven years ago. Every year, new stuff comes out because they can examine stuff closer and all kinds of stuff.

Dylan Tanaka:
NZT. We're all going to be on NZT.

Nate Guinane:
What's that, Limitless?

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, from Limitless.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah.

Hassan Imran:
Oh.

Dylan Tanaka:
Take that pill, and then you're like...

Nate Guinane:
Yeah. I'll have to look back because-

Dylan Tanaka:
It's real.

Nate Guinane:
... I have a couple books left.

Hassan Imran:
It's real.

Dylan Tanaka:
It might be real.

Hassan Imran:
You said it so confident.

Dylan Tanaka:
It's be better than-

Hassan Imran:
It's real. It might be real.

Dylan Tanaka:
It'd be better than sitting here talking about how to sell dispensaries. At least you're putting people in this way instead of that way, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yep, yep. That's true.

Dylan Tanaka:
That's a whole different discussion. Erika, tell us about what books you're reading.

Erika Weichel:
I am midway through a course called Rainmaker's Laboratory. It's almost like a book club for like-minded people in my business. We do calls every other week on what we've learned and just discuss different topics.

Hassan Imran:
That's smart.

Erika Weichel:
They take bits and pieces from a bunch of different books, many of them that we've talked about on the show before. It's a nice way to... I'm better at talking about it because...

Dylan Tanaka:
Is there anything specific you can point out to us? I'm putting her on the spot.

Erika Weichel:
I don't like that.

Hassan Imran:
Well, what was one of the more recent books that you guys just finished up?

Erika Weichel:
What is it called? Right Hook, Left Hook, I think, is the one that we just got through doing. Is that... I'm really bad.

Dylan Tanaka:
Jab, Jab, Left Hook?

Erika Weichel:
There you go.

Dylan Tanaka:
Or Jab, Jab, Right Hook?

Erika Weichel:
There you go. I'm so bad.

Dylan Tanaka:
[crosstalk 00:37:59] Gary.

Hassan Imran:
You're recommending the wrong book.

Dylan Tanaka:
You're talking about Gary V's book?

Erika Weichel:
No, no, no, no. Rich Griffin is one of our head sales people through North American along with Michael [Holden 00:38:14], so they put on a big thing. There's about 30 of us that all just-

Hassan Imran:
Nice.

Erika Weichel:
We do calls about once a month. It's a half an hour, hour, and but then everyone... There's a big page, and we all go back and forth on some.

Hassan Imran:
Oh, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
It's huge to do that stuff. I mean we're so lucky now to have what we have with technology. I always talk about, when I started real estate investing, there was not YouTube. Then it was two-minute videos. You guys can watch everything. You don't have to go to any courses. I mean there is still value in paying for something for sure, but there's a lot of free information out there.

Dylan Tanaka:
To be able to have a little mini network like that where... As entrepreneurs, again, we got to lean on each other because it's really hard to be a true solopreneur. It's not impossible, but like I said, you've got to almost have zero personality and want to sit and be an egghead all day because what's the fun if you can't bring lunch in and feed a bunch of people and make them happy? You know what I mean? The whole office smelled like Arabic food as soon as I walked in the building.

Erika Weichel:
It was so good.

Hassan Imran:
It was good, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
We were on our way to lunch right then and there, so I had to go across the street and have a crappy salad, and I could have had some shawarma and some good stuff, but next time.

Hassan Imran:
Just really quick to go back to that, I think when we were talking about doing a big deal or doing something that's outside of your comfort zone, the big thing, for me, was to connect with other people that were doing really big things, and then it made me feel... The 13 deals, I think that that's like chump change.

Dylan Tanaka:
Right. That's awesome.

Hassan Imran:
That's a little baby deal because now I've tried to connect with people who are doing hundreds and hundreds or thousands of deals a year. It's kind of like nothing. When you get in a sphere of a group where they're just... it's a lot of high-caliber people, whatever you're doing just seems minuscule. That's a great way to just pop out of your comfort zone and... Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Then like we talked about, you have a big belief in yourself. Us three can be in the big head club together. We're going to start a new podcast about that. We're just going to sit around and brag about everything we've done.

Erika Weichel:
Oh, no. No, you can't call that, though.

Dylan Tanaka:
Let me get that domain name. Producer, grab that domain name from GoDaddy. I don't know. I think that's it, huh?

Erika Weichel:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
We've gone over everything?

Erika Weichel:
I think so. I mean it's just the only other thing I was going to add is the networking portion, so I mean... and that's by going to Chicago or going to REAAs or other networking groups and meeting people, and not just online because I mean, although that connection is always nice when you go to some of the bigger groups or the national groups and you're meeting people, that's where a lot of my business planning, a lot of people that are doing much bigger things than I am, and you get to talk to them and, "How did you get to that place?" I mean it's really just important to connect with those people.

Hassan Imran:
1,000%. I was just talking to Nate before we started, but that I was just telling him that I'm going to go to the BP conference in, wherever, Nashville or something. It's like 1,000 bucks, which is... That's not cheap, but-

Dylan Tanaka:
Especially for a sell-a-thon.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Because you're going to get pitched all day and night, baby.

Hassan Imran:
Exactly, but it's the people.

Dylan Tanaka:
You'll never be any good people as you will there.

Hassan Imran:
It's the people, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Learn from the guys on stage, how they close, and then just network the heck out of it.

Hassan Imran:
Exactly. That's what it's all about, yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
It'll be worth every penny.

Hassan Imran:
That's the gold right there.

Dylan Tanaka:
That's cool.

Hassan Imran:
You go. You meet with some high rollers and you're like, "Whoa." Now I thought I had set my expectations high. I remember, one time, I went to a conference, and I was like, "Yeah, I want to get to..." I think it was 50 or 100 doors was my goal. The guy was like, "Yeah." He was my age. I'm like, "What's your goal?" He's like, "I'm trying to get to $1 billion."

Dylan Tanaka:
Wow.

Hassan Imran:
Before he's 30. I was like, "What?" Then I walked away. I was like, "What am I doing?" It's like that... Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Let me ask you guys one question, too, while I got you here. I think you guys are both above the level of investor that I'm thinking about, but if you were right at that spot where you were almost taking it to the next level, do you think that it would make more sense to go to something like that Bigger Pockets meeting where there's going to be a bunch of speakers on stage who are selling courses, and it's more about networking, or do you think you'd be better off going to an event where there's a bunch of experts speaking that aren't selling anything that are just telling, basically, their stories and how they do things all in different segments of the business?

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, I think they're both useful. I guess if could pick between the two, I'd rather the non-sell because they're telling you more instead of holding back for their sale. If you can't go to that... Those are cool because there's probably going to be 1,000 people there in the stands or whatever, so he can meet all kinds of people, but yeah, that is a lot better because, like I said, then they're not selling their course, because if they're selling the course, they can't tell you everything. They can't just be like, "Here it is," because then why are you going to by a 5, $10,000 course?

Dylan Tanaka:
You either pay in the front or the back, so you're either going to pay more to go to one of those events where you're just going to learn, or you're going to pay less. For me, a lot of times, I prefer to go to both, of course, if I can, but if I go to the big one, I'm going to meet a whole bunch of people too. I think, for that person that's just ready to take it to the next level, the ones who don't have the big head yet, they're trying to get there, that they're better off going to the ones where they're going to learn.

Nate Guinane:
Yeah, for sure.

Hassan Imran:
Yeah. Go anywhere where you can just find someone who you can bounce an idea off of or talk to about how they started.

Dylan Tanaka:
Yeah, that's great advice.

Hassan Imran:
Anywhere you can go, even it's on a Zoom meeting, even if you find some guy online and it's like, all right, this person's doing stuff that I want to do. Just connect with them. I have friends. I have a friend, right now, who just paid a guy 1,000 bucks for two hours of his time over lunch and because that person's in our local area doing two, three hundred flips a year, and he wants to get to that level. You pay for it in some way. Either it's your time or it's physical or it's money or something.

Dylan Tanaka:
Sure, or do business with... I tell these young guys that have come to REAA the last 15 years and they're like, "How could we buy you lunch? Will you be my mentor?" I'm like, "I'll be your mentor every day. Find me deals." That's it because I'm stuck hanging out with you then, right?

Hassan Imran:
Yeah.

Dylan Tanaka:
Bring me deals. Bring me deals. Bring me deals.

Hassan Imran:
Exactly, exactly. 1,000%.

Dylan Tanaka:
All right, so-

Erika Weichel:
I think we're good.

Dylan Tanaka:
All right, everybody. Well, again, this has been another Michigan Real Estate Investor Network Round Table. Make sure you subscribe. You can find us on YouTube, on Apple Podcasts. We're on Google Podcasts. We're on Stitcher. We're on all those other places so you can find us, but make sure that you check us out. We're here all the time bringing you real information and, as always, sharing the love.

Speaker 2:
We hope you found a lot of value in today's show. If there's anything we mentioned and you missed it, don't worry. We take all of the notes so you can find them at michiganreinetwork.com/episodes. If you want to meet any of today's guests in person, you can usually find them at a #TheNetwork meet-up in metro Detroit. You can find all about the network at www.michiganreinetwork.com. By the way, if you're new, hit that subscribe button so you don't miss any future episodes of this show. This brings us to the end of another episode of #TheNetwork Round Table Podcast and, as always, share the love.